Face mapping is an ancient practice rooted in Ayurveda teaching and Chinese medicine. It views your face as a ‘roadmap’ so that you can identify underlying issues in other parts of your body. The skin on your face is a true expression of your body’s overall health.

Spots and acne may be something we associate with our teenage years; however, for many adults facial acne unfortunately continues into middle age. Statistics suggest that 25% of men and 50% of women suffer from adult acne, and for some people it can be persistent and even become a chronic condition. GPs and dermatologists are seeing a far greater number of adult patients in relation to acne concerns than in previous decades. 

What is causing an increase in adult acne?

Nowadays, our lives are frantic and we work / live at a much higher and faster rate than in previous decades. Whilst the advent of mobile phones, the internet, email and social media has made communication quicker and easier, it has also meant that many people are unable to really switch off and relax. Acne is linked to an increase in stress levels as well as a fluctuation in hormone levels (again, often linked to stress), so this is without doubt a potential culprit. 

In addition, we are eating more convenience foods than ever before – again, this is due to living at such a fast rate. Grabbing a quick snack on the go is a convenient alternative to sitting down and eating a proper, well-balanced and home-cooked meal. However, convenience foods, processed foods, ready meals and takeaways are laden with sugars, salt and saturated fats, and they are often lacking in any great nutrition. This mixture of toxins and low nutrients has a direct impact on skin.  Furthermore, alcohol and caffeine is definitely a skin foe – and, once again, we are drinking more alcohol and caffeinated drinks than ever before.

What is your skin trying to tell you?

Face mapping is an ancient practice rooted in Ayurveda teaching and Chinese medicine. It views your face as a ‘roadmap’ so that you can identify underlying issues in other parts of your body. The skin on your face is a true expression of your body’s overall health. When one part of your body is unbalanced then it has a knock on effect on other parts of your body, including major organs. Everything works together in harmony, and the most effective way to ensuring your body is happy and balanced is to eat a nutritious and sensible diet, exercise regularly, sleep well and keep stress under control through relaxation techniques.

  • Acne on your forehead is a sign your liver and gallbladder are under stress. Try cutting out or reducing intake of alcohol, convenience foods, processed foods, ready meals and takeaways, and saturated fat.
  • Acne between your eyebrows is a sign you are drinking too much alcohol, smoking too much, and consuming too high a quantity of rich food (for example, salty snacks and dairy).
  • Acne on your nose is connected to your heart and lungs. Support your heart health by eating plenty of oily fish (rich in omega-3 and omega-6), at least 5 portions a day of fruits and vegetables, and unsalted nuts.  Ask your GP to check your blood pressure too.
  • Acne on your chin is linked directly to hormone levels, and women are most susceptible to spots in this area. 
  • Acne around your mouth and along your jawline is connected to your digestion. If you are prone to IBS then you may find you are more susceptible to acne in this area. Watch your intake of trigger foods, as well as spicy / rich / processed foods. Eat naturally and consume plenty of wholegrain carbohydrates, fibre, and fruits and vegetables.